The Kenwood Press
Letters to the Editor: 08/01/2018

Letters to the Editor Aug. 1, 2018



Hold Gorin to account on marijuana cultivation

Dear Editor,
Prior to the last election for First District Supervisor, I was on a committee of five from the Sonoma County Democratic Club. We interviewed all candidates running for the position. We directly asked Susan Gorin what she thought of marijuana and where she thought it should be cultivated in Sonoma County for commercial businesses. Her reply: She thought it should be grown in industrial, self-contained areas and not in rural residential neighborhoods.

Do your research. Read the paper. Susan Gorin has not kept her campaign promise to our committee as to where commercial marijuana should be cultivated.

Carol Smith
Santa Rosa

Worried about cannabis exclusion zones

Dear Editor,

I am writing to express my concern about the potential creation of a cannabis exclusion zone in the Bennett Valley area. The cannabis operators in this area have eagerly worked to comply with the direction of the Board of Supervisors and all other governing agencies. To throw away decades of their work and tens of thousands of dollars that they have invested is unethical and will damage the local economy.

Cannabis cultivators have been contributing positively to Sonoma County for many generations. It is unfair to punish them after they have worked tirelessly to comply with the countyís guidelines at the mercy of an outspoken minority that does not understand the importance of the medicine they create.

Under the current political regime, it is vital that we do not regress and succumb to the demonization of an industry that at its core is dedicated to helping people live healthier, more fulfilling lives.

Shivawn Brady
Glen Ellen

Oakmont needs a dog park

Dear Editor,

I used to go to the dog park at the polo field before we found a house with a yard. Have the people with negative comments ever taken their dogs to the polo field when it was open to our pooches? Let me tell you what I saw back in those days. I saw that about 80 percent of the people there were older women with small dogs. The ladies were long past days of pickleball, golf, or even just walking half an hour a day. They were living alone with just a small pup for their main company. Like all of us in Oakmont, they were in the closing chapters of life that bring loss of family closeness, loss of health and loss of friends. They would bring their dogs to the polo field for an hour of contact with other human beings, for some time outdoors, for time to laugh at the antics of the dogs, for time to feel part of a larger community. They watched out for each otherís dogs and picked up each otherís dog poop, if necessary.

And that all worked! The dog park users gravitated to certain times during the day and small groups formed of the morning people, the noon people, the late afternoon people. We would joke that we knew the names of the dogs before we knew each otherís names. For too many dog park users, it was their only contact with other people during the day. It was so simple, so healthy and so beautiful to see in action. Isnít this what we should be encouraging for the unseen and unheard population of Oakmont? Itís such a small thing Ė a grassy spot to gather with your dogs, visit a bit, get out of the house and go home with things to think about other than why your kids didnít call or how much you miss your old home and friends.

Letís have big hearts here and give this dog park a chance.

Patty Ewing
Oakmont