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Out, About & Around the County: 04/01/2018

Out, About & Around the County April 1, 2018



Ecology Center speakers in Sonoma



Garland Lamb, senior restoration ecologist, and Mark Newhouser, project manager for the Sonoma Ecology Center are special guests for the Valley of the Moon Garden Club’s April 5 meeting. They will discuss the various garden-related community outreach projects performed by the center, with a focus on native plant nursery, water shed preservation and wild fire assessment and restoration. Open to all. Members are free; guests $5. A meet-and-greet starts at 6:30 p.m., with the meeting at 7 p.m. Complimentary refreshments and a plant raffle follow.

Info: Sonoma Veterans’ Building, 126 First St. West, Sonoma.


Through a pinhole



Local artist James Huff will exhibit his photographs at the Sonoma Valley Library during the month of April as a part of the library’s 2018 artist series. There will be a reception on April 6, 4-6 p.m. Huff’s photographs are taken with homemade pinhole cameras. By manipulating the internal aspect ratios, size, number and placement of pinholes and other options, Huff gets "a specific image that is absolutely unique." He started pinhole photography in the 1980s to teach children about photography, and started solar track images in 2011. Each piece can take from several weeks to more than a year to create.

Info: www.sonomalibrary.org. 755 W. Napa St., Sonoma.


Economic outlook from the Fed’s perspective



Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness — what is the outlook? We expect the economy to grow, but by how much and will it be sustainable? Is inflation a concern? On April 6, John C. Williams, President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, will speak at the World Affairs Council’s luncheon about "The current economic outlook and its implications for monetary policy." Williams serves on the Federal Open Market Committee, bringing the Fed’s Twelfth District perspective to monetary policy discussions in Washington. Noon at the Flamingo Hotel. Cost is $31 members, $36 guests. Send checks to WACSC, P.O. Box 1433, Santa Rosa, CA 95402.

Info: 2777 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa.


Bennett Friedman Quartet performs



The Music Department of Santa Rosa Junior College (SRJC) presents a jazz concert by the Bennett Friedman Quartet on April 6, at 8 p.m. in Newman Auditorium on the SRJC campus. Guitarist Randy Vincent, organist Brian Ho, and drummer Lorca Hart will be featured. Ho brings his Hammond B-3 for this event. He is a graduate of U.C. Davis, and regularly performs at Bay Area jazz venues such as Yoshi’s in Oakland and many area jazz festivals. General admission is $10; $5 for students and seniors. Proceeds from the concert benefit the SRJC Foundation Jazz Studies Fund.

Info: pr.santarosa.edu/bennett-friedman-quartet-april-6. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa.


KQED’s Forum on the road



KQED’s Forum hits the road on April 6, with hosts Michael Krasny and Mina Kim broadcasting from the Luther Burbank Center at 8:30 a.m. North Bay resident Kim returns to Santa Rosa six months after wildfires ravaged the area to reflect and look forward with the residents, artists, reporters, and others who are rebuilding their communities in the wake of destruction. The two-hour live event offers an inside look at how KQED produces the daily call-in program that presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues, as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts. Free to attend, but registration is required.

Info: fotrsantarosa.eventbrite.com. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa.


Free concerts at the library



On April 7 at 2 p.m., the Sonoma Valley Library will host the Brazilian band, Rua Samba. Rua Samba explores a wide variety of Brazilian music including samba, choro, bassa nova, and balao. The music, some of which dates to the early 1930s, reveals a culture rich in lovely melodies and exciting rhythms. Then, on April 14 at 2 p.m., the library presents Trio Capriccio. Trio Capriccio performs classical and diverse folk-based music using combinations of two violins, viola, and cello. Featuring trained classical cellist Kathryn Vast, violist Ashley Holmberg, and violinist Niranjana Parthasarathi. Free.

Info: 996-5217. 755 W. Napa St., Sonoma.


One night in Paris



Take a trip to Paris in the 1930s — Montmartre near the Moulin Rouge — with a Gypsy jazz and musette show featuring Rue Manouche at Sonoma’s Sebastiani Theatre, April 7 at 8 p.m. In the footsteps of Django Reinhardt, Edith Piaf, Maurice Chevalier, Charles Trenet and others, Rue Manouche, plays music in the style of Gypsy jazz. “One night in Paris” is an exciting evening with talented musicians Jeff Magidson, Paul Mehling, Evan Price, David Miotke, Michel Saga and popular vocalist Isabelle Magidson. Seating is limited. 100 percent of wine sales will go directly to the Sebastiani Theatre Foundation, plus an additional $1,500 donation to support the foundation.

Info: ruemanouche.bpt.me. 476 1st St. East, Sonoma.


Maker Space Open House



On April 7, Chimera Arts & Maker Space will host its second anniversary Open House at the old Ford Garage building in Sebastopol. The day will feature food, drinks, live music, machinery demos, and most importantly, members’ work. Doors open at 12 p.m. and won’t close until dark. Enjoy Lagunitas IPA, local wines, and Guayaki Yerba Mate, plus live music from Chimera’s own Tyler McCourtney as the one-man-band Banjo BoomBox, as well as the diversely talented Kalei Yamanahoa. There will be demonstrations of Chimera’s machinery including 3D printers, a wood turning lathe, laser cutter/etcher, machinist’s lathe, and a CNC router. There will also be jeweler’s/metal-smithing demos and a demo of a product created at Chimera, The Body Lever, by staff member Steve Terry.

Info: chimaraarts.org. 6791 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol.


Fiddle on fire



Santa Rosa Symphony and Music Director Bruno Ferrandis welcome electric violin pioneer Tracy Silverman to the Weill Hall stage at the Green Music Center, April 7-9, to play "Dharma at Big Sur," which was written for him by Pulitzer-winner John Adams. Lauded by the BBC as "the greatest living exponent of the electric violin," Silverman’s groundbreaking work with the 6-string electric violin defies musical boundaries. The April concert also features the Sonoma State University Symphonic Chorus, conducted by Santa Rosa Symphony Choral Director Jenny Bent, and mezzo-soprano Jacalyn Kreitzer for Sergei Prokofiev’s Alexander Nevsky. The program opens with Richard Wagner’s "Prelude" and "Liebestod" from Tristan and Isolde. Single tickets start at $29.

Info: 546-8742, www.srsymphony.org. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park.


How ready are you?



The second annual Graton Area Disaster Preparedness Fair will be held at the Graton Fire Department on April 7, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. This free, family friendly event will help community members learn how to empower themselves during a disaster. The fair includes booths from sponsoring nonprofits and government organizations, such as the Graton and Sebastopol Fire Departments, Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, Sonoma County Fire and Emergency Services, the Community Disaster Response Team, and more. The Graton Fire Department will conduct fire extinguisher training and CPR training. Families can learn how to escape from a burning building and test their knowledge (and win prizes!) through games. Adults will learn how to turn off gas valves, avoid electrical hazards, develop survival strategies, and provide emergency first aid. There will be information about large animal rescue, search and rescue, ham radio operation, and volunteer opportunities.

Info: 3750 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Graton.


Stick out your green thumbs!



The Sonoma County Master Gardeners will host a series of workshops around the county on April 7. Learn about building an (almost) native garden from Bill Klausing at the Healdsburg Regional Library; The option of straw bale gardening from Marybeth Hull at the Petaluma Regional Library; gardening with pollinators in mind from Gina Hitchcock at the Rohnert Park-Cotati Regional Library; and conquering gophers and moles from Jim Lang at the Windsor Community Garden. All workshops run 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Info: ucanr.edu/sites/scmg/?calendar=yes&g=43833.


By the Water at Spreckels



It’s 2012 and the unprecedented destruction of Hurricane Sandy touches a small, close-knit community on the coast of Staten Island. By the Water, running through April 8 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center, opens on what’s left of the Murphy house; built by Marty Murphy’s grandfather, it sits seven blocks from the ocean and has been destroyed. Although in their 60s, the Murphys are determined to rebuild. But their neighbors, including their best friends, are organizing the town to solicit a government buy-out so they can start over somewhere else. By the Water, by Sharyn Rothstein, explores what it means to love a community — and what other motivations either bind us to a place or free us to move on.

Info: www.spreckelsonline.com.


Exploring the headwaters of the laguna



Explore the upper reach of the Laguna de Santa Rosa from downtown Cotati to the historic "headwaters" on a gentle, level, (but not wheelchair accessible) 3-mile walk on April 8, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Local experts will share their knowledge and insights of the natural and cultural history of the area. This leisurely amble will include highlights about the Ross Street vernal pools; Cotati Creek Critters restoration and education work; Rohnert Park’s Lydia Commons Community Garden, where you’ll stop for a picnic lunch; and the surprising historic headwaters of the Laguna de Santa Rosa. Bring your own lunch; cookies will be provided. Cost is $10-$50 sliding scale (which benefits the Laguna Foundation). Pre-registration required.

Info: www.lagunafoundation.org


Living well with serious illness



UCSF Professor of Medicine and founding director of the UCSF Palliative Care Program Dr. Steven Pantilat will discuss "Living Well With Serious Illness" on April 13, at Vintage House in Sonoma, 12:30-1:30 p.m. "Unfortunately there are many false assumptions about serious illness that make it even harder to get good care. One false assumption is that you have to choose between quantity and quality of life. The truth is that you can have both," said Pantilat. There is no cost to attend. A light lunch and refreshments will be provided. Following the talk there will be two workshops, one from 2-3 p.m. and one from 6:30-8 p.m., to create your own Advance Health Care Directive, led by experts from Sonoma Valley Hospital, Hospice by the Bay, and My Care My Plan.

Info/RSVP: 996-0311, 935- 5257 or ckrusedelarosa@svh.com. 264 1st St. East, Sonoma.


Social Justice Conference at SRJ



Santa Rosa Junior College (SRJC) and North Bay Organizing Project are partnering for the second annual "We the Future Social Justice Conference" on April 13, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., at SRJC Petaluma. This year’s theme, "Feeding Ourselves, Feeding Our Souls" reflects the issues of social justice in the realm of food, as well as the urgent concern with healing, nourishing, and building healthy communities in the aftermath of the North Bay fires. The conference keynote speaker will be Nikki Silvestri, a thought leader on issues of food justice and sustainability who was named one of the 100 Most Influential African Americans by The Root magazine. The event is free and open to all. Enjoy free lunch and live music at noon by SLV, soulful Chicana protest songs that mix pop, electronic, hip-hop, and world genres.

Info: wethefuture.santarosa.edu.


Native Americans and Sonoma’s wine industry



The Sonoma Valley Historical Society continues its "Second Saturday" lecture series on April 14 with Dr. Peter Meyerhof speaking on, "The Role of a Native American in Establishing Sonoma’s Wine Industry." on April 14, 2 p.m., at the Sonoma Community Center. Meyerhof will discuss his latest research that sheds light on a long forgotten contributor to the earliest days of the Sonoma Valley wine industry: A Native American who had probably labored at the Sonoma Mission and learned the skills of grape cultivation in the years before the arrival of General Vallejo. Cost of the lecture is $5 for the general public, historical society members and local docents are free.

Info: 276 East Napa Street, Sonoma.




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